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Friday, August 13, 2004

All kinds of good stuff on the web today. Eric Gunnerson is leaving the C# team for the movie maker team. Don Box is interviewed by the .Net Developers Journal.

But the article I think is most interesting is How Microsoft Lost the API War by Joel Spolsky. Really interesting article about...well, lots of stuff Microsoft may be doing wrong. Well worth a read. I won't comment because a lot of what he says is an attempt to predict the future - but I will say that some of the brightest people in the world work for Microsoft - and they have very deep pockets. Microsoft has net profits of over a billion dollars a month.

What was it Alan Kay said?

"Don't worry about what anybody else is going to do. The best way to predict the future is to invent it. Really smart people with reasonable funding can do just about anything that doesn't violate too many of Newton's Laws."

And just for good measure,

"Would you like me to give you a formula for success? It's quite simple, really. Double your rate of failure. You are thinking of failure as the enemy of success. But it isn't at all. You can be discouraged by failure - or you can learn from it. So go ahead and make mistakes. Make all you can. Because, remember that's where you will find success."

- Thomas J. Watson - Founder of IBM

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